Related Links

To add more fun to your “kiting… on a roll” experience, check out these web sites:


The Beaufort Wind Scale was created for sailors in 1805 by British Rear Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort as a way of estimating wind speeds without using instrumentation. Kite flyers also use this scale to select the appropriate kites for the apparent wind. Here are some sites for this scale:

http://www.howtoons.com/?page_id=150 is a wonderfully illustrated Beaufort Wind Scale. Click on the scale to enlarge.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaufort_scale gives history and information about the scale along with the chart.

http://www.alltwaliswindfarm.co.uk/BWEA_School_Pack.pdf. This section offers information and activities about the wind.”


 

www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/k-12/airplane/shortk.html A kite index listing all the topics in NASA’s Beginner’s Guide to Kites. Clicking on the subject line will lead you to a scientific explanation of that particular topic.


http://www.my-best-kite.com/how-does-a-kite-fly.html How does a kite fly, you might ask. This website summarizes of all the reasons your single-line kite flies at the height it does.


www.kitehistory.com/index.htm An interesting site filled with lots of information about historical kite fliers (Ben Franklin, Alexander Graham Bell) and kites (meteorological and military). Click on any person or kite type for a summary of the selected topic.


http://www.drachen.org/pdf/Kite-Bibliography/Kite-Bibliography.pdf A wonderful list of books that use kites and kite flying from different cultures as a focus of the books. Each title contains a brief description of the book and how it uses the kite.


http://www.kiteplans.org An extensive list of kite plans for a huge variety of kites.


We found a website that might really interest you. Visit the link below to find an interactive mapping of great places to fly kites across America. http://find.mapmuse.com/. The site is created so that you may also add your favorite kite flying site if it is not already listed.


Some web sites that might give you a better understanding about why and how a kite flies are: http://www.2020site.org. Scroll down to the “How To” section and Click on “How to Fly a Kite”. Once there, click on “The Science of Kite Flying”. And the K-8 Aeronautic Internet Textbook page http://wings.avkids.com/Curriculums/Vehicles/kite_summary.html. If you type this in, pay close attention to capital letters. There is also an _ between kite and summary. Scroll down to “Teacher Text”.


Teaching ESL Content through Kite Making for Grades K-12. Visit http://eric.ed.gov. In the search box enter in ED362016.


KITEcast, the spot to get all your kiting weather information and specialized imagery, along with articles, tips, and other unique features!


Established in 1998, Kitelife features a free bi-monthly on line magazine devoted to promoting all walks of kiting with a dazzling array of articles, plans, event coverage, commentary, videos and photos. Kitelife is a “lifestyle” publication and one of the largest kite sites in the world, bringing you the splendor and personalities that make up modern kiting. Also featured on the site are archives of out of print kite periodicals, classified ads for buying/selling used kites or accessories, and more resources than you can shake a spar at!


This link reflects the international appeal of kiting. The site, which presents the international history of kite flying, was created in France and translated into English by a Canadian. A terrific resource, no matter what the language. If you scroll down to the bottom of the home page, you will find a section entitled Actualities/News. This tells you about kite happenings all over the world. Pretty interesting!


A terrific educational tool geared towards upper elementary age and up. Good background information on kites, to be used as teaching tools for math and science teachers, kite flyers wanting more technical information. Be sure to visit the Index page on the site.


The site of the Australian Kite Association offers a lot of information. Check out the page called “Kites in the Classroom.”

Teachers, be sure to read:

Suggestions About How Kites Might be Used Within Schools – A Guide for Teachers”


The site of the American Kitefliers Association. Check out Table of Contents for topics you want to explore: Festivals particularly a calendar of events, Publications, especially How to Fly a Kite, Kites in the Classroom, Other Kite Related Sites for businesses, kite clubs and miscellaneous topics.


This site helps you calculate the altitude of your kite. Pretty clever!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *